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Mortality Factors for Severe Septic States in Intensive Care Unit

Summary Background: Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by an inappropriate host response to an infection. Severe sepsis is a source of morbidity and high mortality in intensive care. The objective of our study was to analyze mortality factors associated with severe sepsis and to describe the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects. Patients and methods: Monocentric, observational, retrospective study from January 1st, 2015 to June 30th, 2017, concerning the mortality factors of severe sepsis in 40 adult patients in the intensive care unit at Aristide Le Dantec Teaching Hospital in Dakar. Results: Forty-seven cases of severe sepsis were identified out of a total admission of 1242, i.e an incidence of 3.78%. 40 files were exploited. The average age of the patients was 55.75 ± 15.84 years, with extremes of 21 and 86 years. The most common reasons for admission were post-operative gas-gangrene follow-up in 27.5% of patients and septic shock in 25% of patients. The most common infectious foci were cutaneous (27.5%), peritoneal (22.5%) and pulmonary (17.5%). Bacteriologically, there was a predominance of Gram-negative bacilli. Prognostic factors related to mortality were admission from the start for septic shock, presence of hyperthermia at admission, duration of infection before admission, impairment of renal function, and hyperkalemia. Conclusion: Severe sepsis is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. In our context, the prognostic factors are essentially the duration of the infection, the state of shock and the severe renal failure.


Auteur(s) : LEYE PA, TRAORE MM, GAYE I, CREO R, BAH MD, NDIAYE PI, FALL ML, NDOYE MD, DIOUF E
Pages : 555-787
Année de publication : 2020
Revue : J Anest & Inten Care Med
N° de volume : 10(2)
Type : Article
Mise en ligne par : DIOUF Elisabeth